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‘Ice-pick-sharp, packed with intrigue, action and spine-chilling suspense. Devour will keep you gripped from the very first page’ Kathryn Fox

Larkin's Latest

Welcome to my blog, Larkin’s Latest. News on thriller authors and great books to read, the writing process and festivals, incredible people I interview and exciting story locations, courses I run, and things that make me laugh!

Join me at the Whitsunday Writers’ Festival 12-14 July 2013

November 26, 2012

I am so excited to be a part of the Whitsunday Writers’ Festival 2013, which kicks off on Friday 12th July with my one day thriller writing workshop. So if you have ever wanted to try your hand at thriller writing and would like to enjoy a well- deserved long weekend away in the sunny and beautiful Whitsundays, then sign up for the Whitsunday Writers’ Festival. Follow this link for more details.

My workshop will be a hyper-intensive and fun class in the dynamic art of thriller writing. I will reveal techniques for choosing your story, developing plot, writing your critically important opening paragraph, creating pace and suspense, and bringing your characters to life, as well as share tips on getting published.

The festival director, Gloria Burley, has invited fascinating writers to the festival, including  Dr. Tony Ayling, who has written about a dozen books on marine biology and will give an update on the Great Barrier Reef. Dr Anita Heiss is a member of the Wiradjuri nation of central New South Wales and is one of Australia’s most prolific and well-known authors of Aboriginal literature. Joyce Morgan has been a journalist for more than three decades and Conrad Walters has worked in the media for more than thirty years in the United States, where he won awards for investigative journalism. So if you would like to know more about writing fiction, non-fiction or features and news stories, you’ll find authors ready and able to help you.

Why not sign up and join me in paradise?

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my book finds its way to Antarctica

November 20, 2012

I just had to share this wonderful photo from Benjamin McKay who is at Casey Station.

We met at a Sydney talk I was doing on Antarctica and I signed a copy of Thirst, dedicating it to everyone at Casey Station. And there it is… in Antarctica.

It’s a well traveled book, that’s for sure.

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Thirst – Best crime fiction 2012

November 19, 2012

This has just about made a great year perfect! Readings has included my thriller, Thirst, in Best Crime Fiction of 2012! I am very proud and honoured to be in such great company, including Kerry Greenwood’s Unnatural Habits and Honey Brown’s After The Darkness. Eastern European and Scandinavian authors like Camilla Lackberg and Vilmos Kondor are on the list too. Thank you Readings for your vote!

Here is the link to their Best Crime Fiction 2012 list and accompanying book reviews. Readings offers an online ordering service and ebooks too.

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black and white characters or shades of grey?

I have been involved in an online discussion with thriller authors Russell Warnberg, Tom Bryson, Segedy Michael, Laurence Atelier and Sean Smith on whether thrillers reflect the political divide.

The debate has moved on to the whether people are simply good or evil and therefore should characters in thrillers be portrayed that way?

I personally don’t believe that people are either all good or all evil. I enjoy reading and writing stories in which the characters are not black and white, and both hero and villain have flaws and redeeming qualities. What could be more fascinating in a psychological thriller than a mass murderer who is a loving father? I enjoy conveying to my readers what motivates my villains to do the terrible things they do – how they arrived at their political world view. Let us not forget that a terrorist believes what they are doing is right, just as the victims believe their world view is right. Violence to achieve an outcome is a terrible thing and should be condemned but my point is that I think characters should reflect the complexity of human beings. In THIRST I allow the reader to glimpse a brief act of humanity by the villain and there is a moment in the story when a reader might even pity him. That doesn’t stop the reader from also feeling horror at what he is about to do.

I am keen to hear what my readers think on this topic? It’s fun and interesting to hear people’s often very different views.

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